Using web video as a persuasion tool

Review of: 60 Seconds
Product by:
Andrew Angus

Reviewed by:
Rating:
4
On 19 September, 2013
Last modified:19 September, 2013

Summary:

Short web videos can be powerful if you keep the story simple, connect with people's prior knowledge, and stimulate both the auditory and visual senses.

Video is the single most powerful tool you can use to communicate a story, according to Andrew Angus in his book 60 Seconds: How to Tell Your Company’s Story and the Brain Science That Makes It Stick. In order to create a memorable video, there are just three things you need to do:

  • Keep the story simple
  • Connect with people’s prior knowledge
  • Stimulate both the auditory and visual senses

The story needs to be kept simple so that the viewer does not get overloaded with multiple different ideas to process at the same time. The video needs to be short because people are too busy to watch longer videos, and even if they do they are less likely to absorb and retain the information. Ideally you should find a metaphor which communicates the message quickly. By stimulating the viewer’s auditory and visual senses simultaneously, memory retention is greatly accelerated.

Chapter 7 includes a detailed description of how the author’s team went about the process of imagining, scripting and creating a successful animated short video advertising a web-based social performance management platform.

This short book is written as a promotional tool for the author’s video making services, but in the best traditions of content marketing it gives the reader useful information for free. By the end of the book I was reasonably convinced about the usefulness of video as a persuasion tool.

Short web videos can be powerful if you keep the story simple, connect with people's prior knowledge, and stimulate both the auditory and visual senses.

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